Coming up soon at King’s! Conference celebrating the legacy of Joseph Lister: Antisepsis, Surgery, and Global Health.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Joseph Lister, who was Professor of Clinical Surgery at King’s College, London from 1877 to 1893. The appointment of Lister as William Fergusson’s successor was not uncontroversial, as Lister had antagonised many London surgeons by his remarks on the un-scientific character of surgery in the capital. Having developed his methods of antiseptic surgery at the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, Lister brought ideas and techniques to King’s College Hospital which would prove foundational to subsequent conceptions and practice of surgery and medicine. Lister’s methods of promoting sterility of the surgical field before, during and after operation – his ‘system’ – evolved throughout his career and were grounded in antisepsis. Although Lister’s techniques evolved throughout his career, they remained true to the fundamental notion that infection is caused by germs, and that prevention of germs from entering the wound (asepsis) coupled with precautionary measures if they gained entry (antisepsis) is the surest method of avoiding infection. From March 22nd to March 24th 2012, King’s College London will be hosting a major conference to celebrate Lister’s legacy, and will be examining both the significance of his techniques in their historical context, and the enduring impact that Lister has had on twentieth- and twenty-first-century medical and surgical practice. The conference will be run in association with the Royal Society and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, and events will take place at both of these institutions and at the King’s College London Strand Campus. You can access the full program of the conference here The conference will be of interest to academic historians, clinical and healthcare scientists and practitioners , bioscience, health policy and management professionals, and those with an interest in Lister, Listerism and the development of antiseptic surgery. Only a few days are left to register for the conference! The last booking date is March 8th.
Follow this link for registration.

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