Medicine, Health and the Arts in Post-War Britain: Literature and Medicine

On Friday 16th March 2012 I travelled to Bristol for the second in a four-part seminar series addressing medicine, health and the arts in post-war Britain. The seminars are organised by Sam Goodman and Victoria Bates from the University of Exeter and funded by the Wellcome Trust.

The three speakers at the event I attended all addressed the reciprocal relationship between literature and medicine. The other three seminars were about visual arts, music and drama.

The speakers and papers at the literature event were:

James Whitehead (King’s College London): ‘Common Concerns? Literature and Medicine since 1945’
Patricia Novillo-Corvalán (University of Kent): ‘A Case Study in Post-War Literature and Medicine’
Fiona Hamilton (University of Bristol):’The Heart of the Matter: Creating Meaning in Health and Medicine through Writing in Post-War Britain’

And you can listen to a podcast of the event here. I’d recommend a listen to these three thoroughly engaging talks! You can also hear James Whitehead talk specifically about the CHH and our work in his presentation.

Fiona Hamilton, the final speaker, also runs the Lapidus Journal which addresses ‘connections between health and writing, narratives, stories imaginative therapeutic work, poetry, theatre, creative work with other people and questions of wellbeing’. Since meeting Fiona at this event she has invited me to contribute to this journal.

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About Susie Christensen

Susie Christensen is a PhD student in the English Department and Centre for the Humanities and Health at King's College London. Her research concerns modernist literature and late nineteeth/early twentieth century neurology and psychological medicine.
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